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Trainings, Workshops, Events, and Speaking Engagements


May
18
8:00 AM08:00

American Association for Public Opinion Research Annual Conference

Panel: The Impact of Wording Choice, Measurement Construct, and Expanded Response Options on Sexual Orientation & Gender Identity (SOGI) Measurement 

With: Liz Coston, PhD, Assistant Professor of Sociology at VCU

Description of contribution: For the college-aged population, the inclusion of sound, reliable, valid, and meaningful questions that assess sexual orientation and gender identity on college surveys are not only necessary for accurately measuring the size of the LGBTQIA+ (lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer, intersex, asexual and otherwise not-heterosexual, not-cisgender) population, but are also an important first step in informing college-wide policies, programming, initiatives, and human/social services. Using data from a large, ongoing longitudinal study of the behavioral and emotional health of college students at a public university in the mid-Atlantic states (N = 10,310), this project examines not only the change in sexual orientation identification for students over time (data is collected each fall and spring, following a student’s first semester; data collection began in 2011), but also the impact of altering the sexual orientation question to be more expansive, inclusive, and diverse (e.g. moving from three singular categories to best practices-based seven check-all that apply categories). Findings indicate that students’ sexual orientation not only shifts during the course of their time in college due to changing understandings of their own identities, but also shifts dramatically when there are more diverse and nuanced options to check off (e.g. from “bisexual” to “pansexual” and “queer”). What’s more, including a comprehensive gender identity question (as opposed to a binary sex assigned at birth question) allows for the necessary collection of information on trans, gender nonconforming, and non-binary student outcomes and needs, which were previously rendered invisible.

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Apr
25
8:30 AM08:30

16th Hawai`i International Summit on Preventing, Assessing & Treating Trauma Across the Lifespan

Title: Invisibility is Not Invincibility: The Impact of Intimate Partner Violence on Gay, Bisexual, and Straight Men's Mental Health

First/Co-Author: Natasha M. Dickerson-Amaya, Graduate Student in Department of Rehabilitation and Mental Health Counseling, School of Allied Health

Abstract: Intimate partner violence is a critical public health problem. However, there is limited research conducted on and about men who are survivors. This project extends previous research by examining the post-traumatic impact of diverse forms of intimate partner violence (sexual, physical, emotional, control, and stalking) on the internalized and externalized mental health of gay, bisexual, and straight men. Using data from the National Intimate Partner and Sexual Violence Survey (2011; N = 18,957), we find that all men are equally likely to report emotional victimization and controlling tactics (with between 50-70% doing so), while bisexual men are significantly more likely to report physical and sexual violence and gay men are significantly more likely to report intimate stalking. Due to these experiences, gay men are significantly more likely to report missing school or work, but bisexual men are significantly more likely to rate their current overall mental health as poor. Around 10% of all men, regardless of sexual orientation, report post-traumatic stress disorder symptomology; and 30% of all men report difficulty sleeping. This research suggests that sexual orientation is a critical area of focus in the study of violence and mental health for men, and that we can no longer ignore the voices and needs of men survivors: invisibility is not invincibility.


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Feb
18
12:00 PM12:00

Transforming Accessibility Initiative Spring Mini-Conference

Invited Talk: “Disability and Intersectionality: Transforming our Movement”

Description: This session will focus on the role of disability as an axis of identity too often left out of discussions on diversity, equity, and inclusion. Disabled people are routinely excluded from key conversations that directly impact their lives. From high level policy discussions, to social justice and disability rights activism, disability awareness campaigns, and everyday conversations on accessibility, disabled people are often erased, silenced, and derailed. These exclusionary tactics reinforce stigma around disability and often perpetuate structural and interpersonal barriers to equity. This presentation will discuss the role of disability as an identity category as well as how it operates within axes of inequality. Together, we will explore the possibilities for intentionally including and centering disabled perspectives in conversations and decisions about advocacy and social justice at VCU and beyond.

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Feb
18
11:00 AM11:00

Transforming Accessibility Initiative Spring Mini-Conference

The Accessible Campus – Faculty and Student Panel Discussion

This panel will feature five individuals, two students with disabilities, two faculty members, and one disability supports professional. The focus of the conversation will be on their experiences, both positive and negative, with regards to attitudes towards individuals with disabilities on campus, the accommodation process, and access in the educational setting. They will be sharing stories and advice and attendees will have an opportunity to ask questions and learn from those individuals who are involved in this work and world every day.


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Jan
29
1:00 PM13:00

Equality VA Day of Action

Session: Experiences of Gender Beyond the Binary

Facilitator: Bethany M. (bee) Coston

Panelists: Liz Coston, Austin Higgs, Peter Jenkins

Description: The National Center for Transgender Equality (NCTE)’s 2015 U.S. Trans Survey showed that a third of transgender people identify as non-binary, gender conforming, genderqueer or otherwise not within the binary categories of man and woman. This panel discussion will explore the diversity and complexity of the lived experiences of individuals who identify outside of the binary. Panelists will speak on their experiences as non-binary people and allow plenty of time for Q&A dialogue with the audience.

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Dec
11
11:00 AM11:00

Black & Pink Holiday Card Making Party

As you can imagine, the holiday season is often a really rough time for folks inside prison. Whatever holidays you may or may not celebrate this time of year, our incarcerated members are often denied the ability to celebrate their traditions in the ways they choose, whether their desire be to celebrate the returning of light for Solstice, the miracle of Hanukkah, the birth story of Jesus, the tradition of Kwanzaa, New Year’s Day, or something else. All too often our members do not have family and friends to reach out to them with cards or visits, making this time particularly isolating. The cards you will make bring moments of joy, connection and kindness to our members while telling prison staff that people on the outside are watching.

Lastly, but most importantly, the holiday card party you are organizing is about planting a seed of hope. There is strength in hope, and when we fight together, we can win. We do all of our work knowing that once there were no prisons, and that day will come again.

Join the Department of Gender, Sexuality, and Women’s Studies for a Black & Pink holiday card making party! More information can be found here.

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Dec
10
11:00 AM11:00

Black & Pink Holiday Card Making Party

As you can imagine, the holiday season is often a really rough time for folks inside prison. Whatever holidays you may or may not celebrate this time of year, our incarcerated members are often denied the ability to celebrate their traditions in the ways they choose, whether their desire be to celebrate the returning of light for Solstice, the miracle of Hanukkah, the birth story of Jesus, the tradition of Kwanzaa, New Year’s Day, or something else. All too often our members do not have family and friends to reach out to them with cards or visits, making this time particularly isolating. The cards you will make bring moments of joy, connection and kindness to our members while telling prison staff that people on the outside are watching.

Lastly, but most importantly, the holiday card party you are organizing is about planting a seed of hope. There is strength in hope, and when we fight together, we can win. We do all of our work knowing that once there were no prisons, and that day will come again.

Join the Department of Gender, Sexuality, and Women’s Studies for a Black & Pink holiday card making party! More information can be found here.

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Dec
3
9:00 AM09:00

Safe Zone Facilitation

The purpose of Safe Zone is to reduce homophobia, transphobia, biphobia, and heterosexism on the VCU campus, thereby to make our campus a safer and freer environment for all members of our community regardless of sexual orientation, gender identity, and/or gender expression.

Participants:

  • Attend a Safe Zone Workshop, which examines attitudes and beliefs, raises awareness, builds skills, and offers resources - register at training.vcu.edu

  • After attending workshop, display Safe Zone sticker

  • Are open to questions from and about lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer (LGBTQ) people and their issues

  • Support policies that bring equity to otherwise inequitable situations and give open support for LGBTQ issues

  • Encourage others to become part of Safe Zone

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Nov
30
11:00 AM11:00

VCU 50th: Commemorating History Symposium

LGBTQ+ Student Mental Health Services at VCU: Inclusivity, Diversity, and Intentionality - Bethany M. (bee) Coston, Carmina Galvez, Megan Guinn and Kaylin Tingle

Description: Access to inclusive, equitable mental health care resources are limited--and sometimes non-existent--for lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer, intersex, asexual and other non-heterosexual, non-cisgender (LGBTQIA+) college students. To remedy this, VCU has engaged in the deliberate and targeted hiring of named LGBTQ+ positions within University Counseling Services and The Wellness Resource Center, stigma reduction campaigns, inclusive and affirmative care and service delivery, use of social media interventions for mental health and wellness, partnerships and collaborations with both on and off-campus organizations, diverse and intersectional LGBTQIA+ programming, and consistent collection of student perceptions of service efficacy. For the first time, the outcomes of this intentional work will be systematically summarized and detailed. This panel will detail the institutional LGBTQIA+ history at VCU--with a specific focus on mental health care and wellness services--and report the the impact of this work (from 2011 to present) on LGBTQIA+ student mental health outcomes and service usage rates. Audience members can expect to leave with increased awareness about VCU’s LGBTQIA+ history, better comprehension of how institutional decisions impact overall LGBTQ+ student mental health outcomes, and a framework or set of guidelines on best practices for LGBTQ+ student mental health service provision.

Main Event Information:

On Friday, November 30, the university will host Commemorating History: Challenges and Opportunities, a day-long symposium to examine VCU's connection to the legacies of MCV and RPI, explore how the institution has evolved across five decades, consider our achievements as well as our complicated and difficult history, and discuss how we commemorate history on campus.

Alumni, students, current and retired faculty and staff, friends and community members are invited to attend a day of panels, research poster presentations and informative sessions featuring esteemed historians, speakers and members of the VCU and VCU Health communities, including Eugene Trani, president emeritus of VCU and VCU Health System; Beverly Warren, president and chief executive officer of Kent State University and former VCU provost and senior vice president for academic affairs; and Edward Ayers, president emeritus of the University of Richmond.

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Nov
28
3:00 PM15:00

IDEC Dialogue Series: “Demystifying Disability”

  • Rams Lounge, Student Commons, VCU (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

An intimate conversation between disabled people at VCU.

The College of Humanities and Sciences’ (CHS) Inclusion, Diversity, and Equity Committee (IDEC) assists in the development of policy and practices that ensure an academic and work environment characterized by inclusive excellence, supports the development, implementation, monitoring, and ongoing refinement of the College’s Inclusion, Diversity, & Equity Plan and engages in activities that support the College’s diversity and inclusion goals.

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Nov
8
to Nov 11

2018 NWSA Annual Conference: JUST IMAGINE. IMAGINING JUSTICE: Feminist visions of freedom, dream making and the radical politics of futures

Workshop: Teaching Social Justice, Fighting White (/Cis) (/Male) Supremacy

Panelists: Amanda Kennedy, Sarah Augusto, Liz Coston, Bethany M. (bee) Coston

As feminist professors in times of extraordinary injustice, it is our responsibility to prepare students to engage in real world activism and empower them to see themselves as producers of knowledge. Following Freire’s critical pedagogy and hooks’ transgressive teaching, this workshop will explore the feminist, antiracist pedagogical strategies that we use to decolonize our classrooms and transform our students into scholars and activists. In addition to presenting our own tactics, we will open the space for attendees to think about and discuss how to incorporate similar strategies across disciplines, campuses, and communities.

The mainstreaming of white nationalism under the current regime, coupled with the resurgence of social justice movements around the nation, creates a moment that, as feminist professors, cannot ignore. We must teach student how to engage with the social justice movements around them, and provide them new and creative ways of combatting inequality. Turning that goal into practical pedagogy isn’t always easy though, and depends on the (campus, departmental, regional) contexts in which we are located.

One panelist will discuss how she incorporates “hashtag syllabi” in her senior WGS capstone, and asks students to create their own intersectional syllabi; she will also discuss the art and zine projects she uses in her Intro to WGS course. Another describes creating student activist projects to combat ongoing campus bias incidents. A third discusses how linking foundational feminist theories to radical utopian fiction/non-fiction not only informs the development of students’ critical thinking skills, but also cultivates their desire for a sustained revolutionary praxis. Our final panelist will discuss how their project-based social justice course served as a medium for students to respond to issues of racial justice not only on campus, but also in their local Southern community in the wake of Charlottesville.

After briefly discussing our own strategies, we will provide opportunity for small group discussion of attendees’ classes and institutions. Specifically, we will ask them to consider ways that they might challenge traditional classroom power dynamics, engage with artistic and creative pedagogy, and transform their classes into spaces for social justice.

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Nov
2
3:30 PM15:30

Moving From Words to Action: Inclusivity Strategies for Success at the 12th Annual HIGHER Ground Women's Leadership Conference

  • Greater Richmond Convention Center (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

The Annual HIGHER Ground Women's Leadership Conference provides high-quality education and networking opportunities for women. Each year, more than 300 women come together to share ideas, illuminate innovative leadership practices and explore factors that influence their effectiveness at work, at home, and in their communities. This conference provides women with a tremendous opportunity to grow, develop, and learn with practical solutions for success in their personal and professional lives. 

In this panel, you will learn more about gender diversity and inclusion: Diversity and inclusion initiatives often focus on diversity, at the expense of achieving real inclusion. In this session, we'll explore what inclusion is, what the barriers to inclusion, and how each of us can work to overcome those barriers. We'll look at what it takes to recognize and overcome unconscious bias, how stereotypes and expectations affect our interactions, how to be an ally and an active bystander, and what leaders can do to change workplace culture in the direction of greater inclusion. 

Panelists include: Bethany M Coston, Ted Lewis and Bedelia Nicola Richards.

This year's conference will focus on: The Power of Collective Action: Shifting the Leadership Culture. Most leadership journeys begin with an emphasis on self—self-discovery, self-development, self-mastering, and self-actualization. When we shift our focus to link with others, our scope of influence expands outward. In that effort, we reorient ourselves towards a dynamic network of leaders emboldened by a shared purpose. 

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Oct
20
1:30 PM13:30

Virginia Transgender Information and Empowerment Summit (TIES)

Every October, transgender and gender nonconforming folks are joined by friends, family, and allies for TIES. At the 2017 TIES conference, we welcomed more than 250 individuals identifying as trans or gender nonconforming who participated in day’s programs alongside over 100 allies.

Presentation, with Liz Coston: “Gender: Outside the Binary”

Description: The National Center for Transgender Equality (NCTE)’s 2015 U.S. Trans Survey showed that a third of transgender people identify as non-binary, gender conforming, genderqueer or otherwise not within the binary categories of man and woman. Attendees of this session will leave with better knowledge of who genderqueer and non-binary people are, a stronger grasp of terminology and definitions to guide inclusive language practices, and increased awareness of the current political context as it applies togenderqueer and non-binary people. This session is open to all, but those who wish to become better genderqueer and non-binary accomplices are especially encouraged to attend. 


Bios:

Dr. Liz Coston is a faculty member in the Department of Sociology at Virginia Commonwealth University. Their research specialization is in criminology and public policy with a focus on sexuality, gender and gender identity, and race. Their work explores the politics of visibility and how victimization is experienced differently for those whose identities converge at the margins. Additionally, they examine the role of macro level policies and social institutions in exacerbating and compounding social inequalities. As an activist-scholar, they are also involved in social justice efforts in their local community, working to alleviate the inequalities that they research.

Dr. Bethany M. (bee) Coston is an activist-scholar, currently an Assistant Professor of Gender, Sexuality and Women's Studies at Virginia Commonwealth University, specializing in LGBTQ+ identities, lives, and relationships. Specifically, dr. bee studies mental health, neurodiversity, disability, and chronic health; the impact of trauma and violence on resilience; and the importance of community making and collaborative knowledge-sharing in reducing health disparities. Their work has been featured in various journals and book anthologies, and for the 2017-2018 year they were a Robert Wood Johnson Foundation grantee.

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Oct
18
8:00 AM08:00

Best Together: Transforming Our Careers

VCU Human Resources and the VCU Staff Senate are excited to sponsor Best Together: Transforming Our Careers, a career development event that offers participants the opportunity to explore a variety of educational topics while networking with peers. The topics will be related to various learning competencies, such as service excellence, diversity and inclusion, health and wellness, integrity, fostering collaborative environment, leading your career, self, and others. 

Bethany M. (bee) Coston will be facilitating an LGBTQ+ 101 session, in which staff with have the opportunity to learn appropriate/inappropriate language and terminology, develop a better understanding of LGBTQ+ workplace-related experiences, and brainstorm strategies and solutions to increase LGBTQ+ inclusion and equity.

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Oct
16
4:00 PM16:00

Inclusive Public Safety @ VCU - Resource Fair & Panel Discussion: LGBTQ+ Safety On- and Off-Campus

Safety does not look the same for every person in every community, and this includes VCU LGBTQ students, staff and faculty. The 5-6:30pm Panel and Discussion will focus on these and other safety issues. The Resource Fair, taking place both before and after the Panel, will feature groups from both on-and-off campus who support, advocate and serve the LGBTQ community.

This forum is sponsored by VCU's Political Science Department, Equality VCU, the VCU Police Department and the LGBTQ+ Safety Advisory Committee. Panel Discussion 5:00pm-6:30pm, with Resource Fair before (4pm-5pm) and after (6:30pm-7pm).

***Please note this is an event requested by VCU Police Department. As such, officers will be present in uniform and in plain clothes.

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Sep
29
9:30 AM09:30

Increasing Neurodivergent & Disabled Perspectives in Social Justice Advocacy

  • Jamestown 4-H Educational Center (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

A workshop provided at VCU’s Lavender Empowerment Summit, which works to engage LGBTQIA+ students by encouraging their development as leaders. Lav Summit provides a safe space to share experiences and learn about issues within the LGBTQIA+ community and also addresses how to raise awareness about those issues to others. 

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Sep
6
2:00 PM14:00

Future of LGBTQ Studies at VCU

Faculty working in LGBTQ Studies will give brief presentations about their research projects, followed by Q&A, conversation, and a reception. 

This event is organized by the LGBTQIA+ Hub Action Committee, charged with launching a special interest center to be housed within the Division for Inclusive Excellence. This special interest center will eventually be responsible for coordinating LGBTQ scholarship, advocacy and community engagement across and beyond VCU.

Sponsored by the Office of the President, the Division for Inclusive Excellence, the LGBTQIA+ Hub Action Committee, the College of Humanities and Sciences, the VCU Libraries, and Equality VCU

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Aug
11
10:30 AM10:30

#MeTooPhD: Addressing Sexual Violence in and through Sociology - ASA Regular Session

Room 104A; Street Level

Organizer and Presider: Eric Anthony Grollman (University of Richmond)

Panelists:
Irene Shankar (Mount Royal University)
C. Shawn McGuffey (Boston College)
Nicole Badera (University of Michigan – Ann Arbor)
Bethany Coston (Virginia Commonwealth University)
Karen Kelsky (TheProfessorIsIn.com)

Ways to effectively prevent sexual violence and support survivors of such violence in multiple contexts in sociology, including classrooms, departments, conferences, research abroad, and online. And, ways that we might use sociology to support broader movements to end sexual violence around the nation.

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Aug
9
12:30 PM12:30

Methodologies in Sexualities Studies - ASA Sexualities Preconference

Lunch Plenary – Methodologies in Sexualities Studies                                                         

Chaitanya Lakkimsetti (moderator), Assistant Professor, Texas A&M University

bee Coston, Assistant Professor, Virginia Commonwealth University

Patrick Grzanka, Assistant Professor, University of Tennessee Knoxville

Evren Savci, Assistant Professor, San Francisco State University

Kristen Schilt - Director for the Center for the Study of Gender and Sexuality, Associate Professor, University of Chicago

 

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Jun
11
6:30 PM18:30

Talk LIVE presented by Family Lifeline Young Professionals (FLYP)

The event will feature a lineup of leaders from various backgrounds and industries who will engage and inform young professionals from across the greater Richmond region for an evening of inspiration on growing their careers while supporting their community. These brief talks (15min), conducted in a format similar to a traditional TED event, are intended to stimulate young professionals to make a difference and provide insights on how to activate their career. Our goal is for attendees to learn from local business and community leaders, be inspired by their passion, verbalize with thought leaders, and engage in lively discussions around how they, too, can advance their career while making a difference.

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May
24
2:00 PM14:00

Twitter Town Hall: A Discussion on the Trauma of Inequality (#NCtalkstrauma)

New Connections will be facilitating a Twitter Town Hall on Thursday, May 24, 2018 from 2-3 p.m. (ET), entitled “A Discussion on the Trauma of Inequality.” The town hall will address trauma caused by inequality at the intersections of race, education, economics, and health—both on personal and academic levels. It will focus on two significant issues around inequality and trauma: 1) the vicarious trauma felt by teachers, professors, and professionals who are supporting students, patients, colleagues, etc. struggling with trauma, and 2) the traumas and inequality experienced by minority and first-generation scholars in large institutions. We are delighted to be working with John Kirby, director of the Dornsife Center for Neighborhood Partnerships, Dr. Bethany M. (bee) Coston, professor of Gender, Sexuality and Women’s studies at Virginia Commonwealth University, and Dr. Keisha Bentley-Edwards, director of the Health Equity Working Group at Duke University’s Samuel DuBois Cook Center on Social Equity. As researchers and practitioners working in the sectors of psychology, racism, gender violence, and trauma, these facilitators offer unique personal and professional perspectives on trauma and inequality. Please join us on Twitter, @newconx, on May 24 from 2-3 p.m. (ET), as we discuss the intersections of trauma and inequality. Use our hashtag, #NCtalkstrauma, to join the conversation.

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May
15
12:00 PM12:00

Spit for Science Luncheon Presentation

  • White House - basement conference room (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

Tentative title: LGBTQ+ College Student Mental Health Outcomes and Service Use

Description: Spit for Science survey data now includes better and more expansive sexual orientation and gender identity questions. In doing some preliminary analyses of student experiences with trauma, violence, resilience, and belonging, I found that (as we'd expect, given the literature) LGBTQ+ students at VCU are significantly more likely to report feeling like they don't belong, that they have thought about or attempted suicide, that they have feelings of anxiety/depression/PTSD symptomology, and are significantly more likely to have experienced some sort of past trauma (including physical and sexual violence). What's interesting, though, is that contrary to what the (limited) literature indicates, our LGBTQ+ students are actually significantly more likely to seek out and utilize University Counseling Services and are equally likely to use services at The Well. In conjunction with a representative from The Well and UCS, this project will discuss not only the significance of the S4S findings, but also detail what initiatives VCU has engaged in that might be leading to increased service usage among LGBTQ+ students (including, but not limited to: hiring openly LGBTQ+ people into positions within UCS and The Well; advertising services/programs that are either LGBTQ+ specific or explicitly not-heteronormative/not-cissexist; and collaborations across units that benefits the health and wellbeing of LGBTQ+ students). We hope the findings will act as a sort of "guideline" or "template" for other institutions looking to increase mental health service usage among LGBTQ+ students.

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Apr
25
11:00 AM11:00

VCU Poster Symposium For Undergraduate Research and Creativity

Come out and support Cheyenne Johnson, my undergraduate advisee and winner of VCU Undergraduate Research Opportunities Program’s (UROP) Inclusive Excellence Summer Research Fellowship.

Her presentation, “The Role of Inequality on Health Care Seeking,” was inspired by taking the course, “Sex and Sexuality in the U.S.” in Fall 2016. The course linked contemporary issues about sexual identity, reproductive rights and sexual violence to “historical legacies of power and control.”

“I took a class with my mentor [Bethany Coston, Ph.D.] … and it focused on different marginalized groups,” Johnson said. “I realized that they need more mental health care and they get it less. It’s important to me that people who need care, get it.” 

According to Johnson’s research, previous studies related to mental health care avoidance don’t examine the role of inequality for those who may fall into several minority identity statuses. When you consider the fact that mental health issues are often associated with other chronic medical diseases, this becomes an especially serious issue when people do not receive the care they need.

By analyzing data from the National Health Interview Survey, part of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Johnson will investigate the link between variables such as demographics, mental health conditions and health insurance coverage for marginalized populations — including people of color, LGBTQ+ individuals and those affected by poverty.

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Apr
20
12:00 PM12:00

Commonwealth Society lecture series: #MeToo

Title of talk: "#MeToo: What we know and what we can do about sexual harassment and sexual violence today"

Description: Sexual harassment and sexual violence are pervasive in the U.S., with no less than 1 in 3 women and 1 in 6 men being impacted in their lifetime (and these are just the people brave enough to report their experiences). Whether it be from family members, while at work, or at home with someone you love, the impacts of sexual harassment and violence are widespread and deeply disturbing: over 40% of women and 24% of men will experience rape before their 18th birthdays, 75% of people who report sexual harassment at work will experience retaliation (usually in the form of public humiliation in ways that harm their career trajectory), and nearly 90% of victims of sexual intimate partner violence experience anxiety, depression, or PTSD symptoms. So, what can be done to stop the cycle of violence? In addition to detailing the above statistics, this workshop will offer practical and evidence-based prevention solutions that you can take with you into your everyday lives and share with your communities.

Registration is free but limited to those who are members of The Commonwealth Society.

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Apr
6
4:15 PM16:15

Southern Sociological Society

Session 246. Let's Talk About Sex: Dating, Violence and Childbirth (Room Bacchus A)

Organizer: Elizabeth Hordge -Freeman, University of South Florida

Papers:

  1. The Stress and Suffering of Motherhood & the Ideology of Motherhood: Cultural Inequality, Unwanted Pregnancy, and the Reality of Parenting -- Martha Smithey, Texas Tech University.
  2. Left, Right, Black, and White: College Students Talk about Intra and Inter-Racial Swiping on Tinder -- Alana Jamelle Peck, Louisiana State University; Dana Berkowitz, Louisiana State University; Justine Tinkler, University of Georgia
  3. A Necessary Evil: Sexual Positioning Conversations Among Black Gay Men -- Terrell J.A. Winder, Syracuse University
  4. "We Need More Resources": Stories of QTPOC Sexual Violence Survival in the South -- Bethany M Coston, Virginia Commonwealth University
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